Hilary Duff: 10 greatest movies of all time

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 25: Actress Hilary Duff attends Tribeca TV: Younger at Spring Studio on April 25, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 25: Actress Hilary Duff attends Tribeca TV: Younger at Spring Studio on April 25, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival) /
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7. Raise Your Voice

Original Release Date: Raise Your Voice opened in theaters on Oct. 8, 2004.

Box Office Earnings: The film performed poorly at the box office, debuting at No. 6 in its opening weekend with only $4 million made. Ultimately, Raise Your Voice failed to make back its $15 million budget with a disappointing worldwide total of $14.8 million. These figures pale in comparison to those of Duff’s platinum-selling self-titled second album, which was released one month prior to the film and bowed at No. 2 on the Billboard 200 chart.

Critical Acclaim: To match its box office struggles, Raise Your Voice fared a similar fate with critics, who met the latest Duff starrer with mostly negative reviews. The film holds a far too harsh 15% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, but Duff won a Kids Choice Award for Favorite Movie Actress. Obviously, the kids know a thing or two about movies, and they sure raised their voice.

About the Role: Duff stars in Raise Your Voice as Terri Fletcher, a teenager who aspires to become a professional singer. Following the tragic passing of her older brother Paul (Jason Ritter), for which she feels responsible, Terri decides not to attend a prestigious music program in Los Angeles. However, she realizes her brother wouldn’t want her to give up on her dream and travels to California, against her father’s wishes to hone her craft and follow her passion.

Simply the Best: Recently, Raise Your Voice has come back around in the form of a meme. The scene in which Terri performs a vocal exercise in class sounds like a composite of at least three different voices, and it’s otherwise humorous. But on the flip side, Duff gives her all in a film that’s mostly flat and not nearly as memorable of a story as her other big screen hits. Clearly, it’s not a universal favorite, but it’s an essential staple for fans of Duff’s work in film and music.