Emma and the 10 greatest Gwyneth Paltrow movies of all time

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - OCTOBER 10: Gwyneth Paltrow attends the 2019 amfAR Gala Los Angeles at Milk Studios on October 10, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - OCTOBER 10: Gwyneth Paltrow attends the 2019 amfAR Gala Los Angeles at Milk Studios on October 10, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images) /
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9. Sliding Doors

Original Release Date: Sliding Doors first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival on January 26, 1998 before receiving a theatrical release in the United States on April 24 and the United Kingdom on May 1.

Box Office Earnings: The film proved a modest player at the box office, opening at No. 17 in its first weekend, but ultimately earning over $11 million in the United States. Sliding Doors brought in a worldwide gross of $58 million against a budget of $6 million.

Critical Acclaim: Sliding Doors holds a 62% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, which denotes it received mostly middling reception from critics. While some praised the performances of the cast, others felt Sliding Doors to be a run of the mill romantic comedy with a cute gimmick to add dramatic flare and fresh intrigue.

About the Role: The film stars Gwyneth Paltrow as Helen Quilley, a woman who has just lost her job at a public relations firm and continues to have a difficult day as she loses an earring and misses the train. However, Sliding Doors operates on two different timelines, showing what would happen to Helen if she had made it on the train in time.

In one reality, she catches her boyfriend cheating on her, and in the other, she arrives just after the other woman has left. Helen’s life changes based on the opportunity of chance and choice, proving how much moments matter.

Simply the Best: In all honesty, Sliding Doors is far from Paltrow’s best film or role, but it’s one of her most famous regardless. The film has been referenced because of its premise ever since its release, as it cleverly explored the possibility of love, life, and romance through two disparate realities.

Without question, Paltrow’s performance lights up Sliding Doors, a film that’s, for lack of a better phrasing, missing some energy. She breathes life into Helen, a hollow character, and once again flexes her British accent that she seems to do in plenty of her movies.