Top 10 characters the Arrowverse completely botched

Arrow -- "Purgatory" -- Image Number: AR807B_0126b.jpg -- Pictured (L-R): Stephen Amell as Oliver Queen/Green Arrow, David Ramsey as John Diggle/Spartan, Katie Cassidy as Laurel Lance/Black Siren, Rick Gonzalez as Rene Ramirez/Wild Dog, Katherine McNamara as Mia, Juliana Harkavy as Dinah Drake/Black Canary and Joseph David-Jones as Connor Hawke -- Photo: Colin Bentley/The CW -- © 2019 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Arrow -- "Purgatory" -- Image Number: AR807B_0126b.jpg -- Pictured (L-R): Stephen Amell as Oliver Queen/Green Arrow, David Ramsey as John Diggle/Spartan, Katie Cassidy as Laurel Lance/Black Siren, Rick Gonzalez as Rene Ramirez/Wild Dog, Katherine McNamara as Mia, Juliana Harkavy as Dinah Drake/Black Canary and Joseph David-Jones as Connor Hawke -- Photo: Colin Bentley/The CW -- © 2019 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved. /
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Ciara Renée– Photo by Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images /

3. Kendra Saunders/Hawkgirl

Many people, including myself, were looking forward to seeing Hawkgirl join the Arrowverse, especially given how tough and engaging she was in the Justice League TV series. So, imagine the disappointment when we were greeted with such a weak, pathetic excuse for a hero.

Recruited for the first season of the Legends of Tomorrow ensemble series, Kendra quickly establishes herself as the least capable member of the team, repeatedly rescued and outshined by fan-favorites like Sara Lance, Captain Cold, and the two halves of Firestorm. What little characterization we get for her is only surface-level, mainly dealing with how she’s entirely out of her depth. This makes her a bland and superfluous addition to the crew, and you often wonder why she’s even there, aside from the fact that the script says so.

She was obviously meant to undergo an arc where she gradually comes into her own, but she spends way too much time lamenting her simple days as a barista, whining about her destiny, and wondering whether she can date someone other than Hawkman. By the time she supposedly becomes a formidable warrior, you don’t buy it.

Theatre actress Ciara Renée is saddled with the thankless task of bringing life to this winged waste, and she admirably attempts to inject some emotional weight and wit. Sadly, the writing lets her down at every turn. In the end, Hawkgirl functions as more of a plot device than a character, defined by her destiny and little else.