Remembering A Bronx Tale: A movie full of quotes to live by

CHAMPAIGN, IL - APRIL 17: (L-R): Film critic Richard Roeper, producer Jon Kilik, actor Chazz Palminteri and film critic Leonard Maltin speak onstage at the 'A BRONX TALE' Screening at Virginia Theatre during EBERTFEST 2015 on April 17, 2015 in Champaign, Illinois. (Photo by Timothy Hiatt/Getty Images For EBERTFEST 2015)
CHAMPAIGN, IL - APRIL 17: (L-R): Film critic Richard Roeper, producer Jon Kilik, actor Chazz Palminteri and film critic Leonard Maltin speak onstage at the 'A BRONX TALE' Screening at Virginia Theatre during EBERTFEST 2015 on April 17, 2015 in Champaign, Illinois. (Photo by Timothy Hiatt/Getty Images For EBERTFEST 2015) /
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(Photo by Don Arnold/Getty Images)
(Photo by Don Arnold/Getty Images) /

A Bronx Tale: Coming of age quotes

One of the messages that A Bronx Tale conveys is that life is complicated. Right and wrong isn’t always as simple as black and white. Sometimes, the best course of action is a shade of grey. The main character, Calogero, is growing up in The Bronx, a well-known borough in New York City.

Sometimes, the dynamics of his neighborhood are more complicated than what first meets the eye. The following are several instances that teach Calogero this lesson.

"“You did a good thing for a bad man.”"

This quote came from Calogero’s father after his son witnessed a murder in broad daylight. Initially, it appeared the incident happened over a parking spot. Rumors travel fast in neighborhoods like these, and eventually it became widespread knowledge that Calogero witnessed the crime.

The man who pulled the trigger was notorious organized crime affiliate, Sonny. When the police asked Calogero to identify the shooter, Sonny was present. However, picking up on the fact that his father did not want him involved any further, the young child claimed he had no idea who the shooter was. This makes “C” a hero in the neighborhood.

"“There was change everywhere, but my neighborhood was still the same.”"

In this instance, Calogero is narrating the film. The story has moved forward from the days of his youth to now referencing his teenage years. Specifically, the year was 1968. It was New York Yankees’ star, Mickey Mantle’s final season, Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy would both be assassinated that year, and Richard Nixon would be elected President.

The world was changing at a rapid pace, yet Calogero’s neighborhood felt the exact same as it did when he was a child.