The 10 best (and worst) movie Santas

THE SANTA CLAUSE - Tim Allen provides answers -- warm and funny answers -- to some of the world's most vexing questions: How can Santa come down your chimney if you don't have a fireplace? How does he get to every house in the world in just one night? And how do you get a job like that, anyway? (DISNEY/ATTILA DORY)WENDY CREWSON, ERIC LLOYD, TIM ALLEN
THE SANTA CLAUSE - Tim Allen provides answers -- warm and funny answers -- to some of the world's most vexing questions: How can Santa come down your chimney if you don't have a fireplace? How does he get to every house in the world in just one night? And how do you get a job like that, anyway? (DISNEY/ATTILA DORY)WENDY CREWSON, ERIC LLOYD, TIM ALLEN /
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Best: Edmund Gwenn (Miracle on 34th Street [1947])

Edmund Gwenn is definitively THE best live-action movie Santa for his role in Miracle on 34th Street. Gwenn won the Academy Award for his role as Kris Kringle/Santa, and is the only person who can say that. Miracle on 34th Street is an uplifting and lighthearted film about the acceptance of Santa and the belief that he does exist. Hired by Macy’s to be the stores new Santa, this Kris Kringle wasn’t about bleeding the consumer for every dime, but about helping everyone he could.

Kringle selflessly would send shoppers to other nearby stores if the toy the consumer wanted wasn’t in stock, or if it could be bought cheaper somewhere else. Gwenn brought honesty to the role and a sincerity that wanted what was best for every shopper.

He also brought protection to the role of Kringle, and in one of the more tense moments of the film, Kringle strikes Sawyer, the main therapist for the store. This wasn’t done in an act of aggression toward Sawyer, but in an act of protection for one of the young boys in the building. This scene showed that there are flaws with Santa, he can lose his temper like anyone else, but he did it out of love for a boy he barely knew.

Gwenn made Santa real, honest, and true. He never made him out to be a Saint or a magical being that lived in the North pole, he made him someone to believe in. His magic was in himself and by the end of the film, Gwenn had me believing in Santa once again too.