Every Academy Award Best Picture winner, ranked

HOLLYWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 09: Bong Joon Ho poses with his Award for Best Director, Best Picture ('Parasite') inside The Press Room of the 92nd Annual Academy Awards held at Hollywood and Highland on February 9, 2020 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 09: Bong Joon Ho poses with his Award for Best Director, Best Picture ('Parasite') inside The Press Room of the 92nd Annual Academy Awards held at Hollywood and Highland on February 9, 2020 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images) /
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CODA movie
Coda, an Apple TV+ Original, photo courtesy Apple TV+ | ranking every Academy Award Best Picture winner /

The 94th Academy Awards are less than a week away and critics and fans alike are wondering what movie will take home Best Picture. A month ago, we predicted Belfast would be awarded the esteemed honors, but since then, the momentum seems to be in The Power of the Dog‘s favor. A caveat to this momentum, has been the dark horse candidate CODA‘s precursor wins. We’re ranking every Academy Award Best Picture winner, below.

CODA is a beloved movie and a true feel-good experience many are craving in 2022. CODA would remind me of the 2019 Best Picture winner, ParasiteParasite is the far superior movie in my opinion, but both films seem to have one thing in common during awards season: Universal support. To get up to speed on the Best Picture nominations, find where to stream each nominee.

Ranking the Best Picture winners

It seems the Best Picture nominations this year have not only been celebrated more than the 2020’s nominations, but also have been made more readily accessible to the viewing public. I tweeted in early February after the nominations were announced the viewership numbers (via Letterbox’d) for each film. The numbers exceed the viewership from last awards season as 8 of the 10 nominations are currently available to stream. Nominations like Nightmare Alley (HBO Max & Hulu) and West Side Story (HBO Max & Disney+) have seen exponential viewership increases since their nominations were announced and were added to multiple streaming services.

In the spirit of awards season and with the Best Picture race winding down, I thought I would take the time to give my personal rankings for every Best Picture winner, dating back to 1927.

93. Cavalcade (1933)

92. The Broadway Melody (1929)

91. The Greatest Show on Earth (1952)

90. The Artist (2011)

I don’t hate The Artist. I don’t. I think it was a daring attempt to renew the style of the silent film, while giving the aesthetic a modern take. However, what I feel this movie does most brilliantly, it borrows from another Best Picture winner, The Apartment. In a tense scene, the ‘Peppy Miller’ character speeds her car down the road in hopes of reaching her love, ‘George Valentin’ before he takes his own life. They trick the audience, utilizing the silent film format by showing a ‘BANG’ title card on the screen. The audience thinks George has taken his life, but in reality, Peppy has crashed her car. This borrows directly from the final scene of The Apartment, and for that, I dock points for originality.

Where to stream The Artist: Netflix

89. Around the World in Eighty Days (1956)

Where to stream Around the World in Eighty Days: HBO Max

88. The Life of Emile Zola (1937)

87. Cimarron (1931)

86. Out of Africa (1985)

85. Driving Miss Daisy (1989)

84. Forrest Gump (1994)

I know, I know. Sacrilege, right? I loved Forrest Gump as a child and it is well beloved. Seeing this movie with fresh eyes as an adult has made me sour a bit. What is the message here? Always do what you’re told and you’ll become a college football star, war hero, Olympian, and incredible entrepreneur? Please excuse my jaded take, but it also irks me that this beat out The Shawshank Redemption and Pulp Fiction (two all-time greats) this year to take home the award.

Where to stream Forrest Gump: Amazon Prime Video

83. Crash (2004)

Widely considered to be the worst Best Picture winner ever, I don’t think Crash is unwatchable or anything close to that label. I just think it’s a movie that does not quite work and heavily borrows from other similar ‘converging storyline’ movies before it.

Where to stream Crash: Amazon Prime Video, HBO Max, Hulu

82. The English Patient (1996)

81. Going My Way (1944)

80. Gigi (1958)

Where to stream Gigi: HBO Max